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A sharp filleting knife. The blade is long, thin, and incredibly sharp.

Fillet Blade (Chinese: 吃虎鱼刀 "Tigerfish Fillet") is a Liyue sword.

Ascensions and Stats

Ascension
Phase
Level Base
ATK
2nd Stat
(ATK)
0✦ 1/20 39 7.7%
20/20 94 13.5%
Ascension Cost (0 → 1)
Item Mora.png 5,000 Mora
1✦ 20/40 113 13.5%
40/40 169 19.7%
Ascension Cost (1 → 2)
Item Mora.png 10,000 Mora
2✦ 40/50 189 19.7%
50/50 216 22.8%
Ascension Cost (2 → 3)
Item Mora.png 15,000 Mora
3✦ 50/60 236 22.8%
60/60 263 25.9%
Ascension Cost (3 → 4)
Item Mora.png 20,000 Mora
4✦ 60/70 282 25.9%
70/70 309 29.0%
Ascension Cost (4 → 5)
Item Mora.png 25,000 Mora
5✦ 70/80 329 29.0%
80/80 355 32.1%
Ascension Cost (5 → 6)
Item Mora.png 30,000 Mora
6✦ 80/90 375 32.1%
90/90 401 35.2%

Total Cost (0 → 6)

Item Mora.png 105,000 Mora

Lore

It was said that the Ticker Fish was a favorite among the people of Liyue.
As word caught on, somehow Ticker became Tiger.
Now, the real Ticker Fish is hard to come by,
but Tiger Fish fillets have become synonymous with delicious fish for the people of Liyue.

Preview

Gallery

Availability

Trivia

  • Kazuha is seen wielding this weapon in the 1.6 livestream, in his character demo and in Collected Miscellany - "Kaedehara Kazuha: Free Spirit" | Genshin Impact, likely because of its resemblance to a katana, befitting his status as a wandering samurai.
  • The Chinese version of the weapon's description contains a pun that is difficult, if not impossible, to retain in other languages:
    • Grilled Tiger Fish is 虎鱼 "Broiled Consuming [Chi] Tigerfish", while the dish's original name, Grilled Ticker Fish, is 虎鱼 "Broiled Hornless-Dragon [Chi] Tigerfish". chī, "eating, consuming" is a homophone of chī, "hornless dragon". The word is also used for Chi, the dragon spoken about in the World Quest The Chi of Yore, and in the Chinese name of Serpent Spine (Chinese: 螭骨剑 "Hornless-Dragon [Chi] Spine Sword").
    • The area of Liyue Harbor known as Chihu Rock (Chinese: 吃虎岩) was likely named after the dish.
  • The sword may be inspired by yútóudāo (Chinese: 鱼头刀), literally meaning "fish-head blades," a modern term given to a type of Chinese single-edged swords mainly used during the Ming period (1368–1644).

Change History

Released in Version 1.0

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